Animation in Portugal

It would be a stretch to describe the handful of companies working in animation in Portugal as an industry. However, the country’s ability to foster talented artists means that there are a great many Portuguese animators working in studios all around Europe.
Despite the challenges, the few companies producing animation in Portugal are doing so to a high artistic standard. The country was hit hard by the financial crisis between 2010 and 2014, but animation production has now returned to its normal, albeit low, level.

Success in shorts

Primarily, the animation work conducted in Portugal has been on original short films, rather than service work or original features or series. The Portuguese government supports the funding of several shorts a year via grants. Successful Portuguese animated shorts include Regina Pessoa’s História Trágica com Final Feliz (Tragic Story with Happy Ending, 2005) and A Suspeita (The Suspect, 2000) by José Miguel Ribeiro.

The Portuguese Film Institute provides support via annual funds dedicated to animated films, while a corporate tax rebate is available to up to 25% of the cost of production. It is hoped that this will help make Portugal a more financially viable place to produce animation in the future.

Animation brain drain and funding struggles

The lack of work available in Portugal for animators has resulted in a significant amount of talent leaving to work in other countries where there are more job opportunities for animators. It is hoped that providing financial incentives for animation production in Portugal could help bring some of that talent back, along with their expertise and contacts.

Public broadcaster RTP is the only Portuguese broadcaster to invest in domestic animation on a regular basis, meaning the sector suffers from a lack of support from the majority of local broadcasters in Portugal.

Calls for extra support

The producers working in animation in Portugal are pushing ahead with the development and production of a small number of animated feature films and series, which, if successful, could provide a key stimulus for growth. There is also scope for greater collaboration between local producers and Portugal’s increasingly active gaming industry.

Local producers are also calling for the tax rebate to be extended in order to benefit the animation sector, while one solution to the lack of support from local broadcasters is the introduction of on-air quotas for animated content produced in Portugal. It would not take a lot in terms of government intervention to make a significant, positive impact on animation production in Portugal.

It would be a stretch to describe the handful of companies working in animation in Portugal as an industry. However, the country’s ability to foster talented artists means that there are a great many Portuguese animators working in studios all around Europe.
Despite the challenges, the few companies producing animation in Portugal are doing so to a high artistic standard. The country was hit hard by the financial crisis between 2010 and 2014, but animation production has now returned to its normal, albeit low, level.

Success in shorts

Primarily, the animation work conducted in Portugal has been on original short films, rather than service work or original features or series. The Portuguese government supports the funding of several shorts a year via grants.

Successful Portuguese animated shorts include Regina Pessoa’s História Trágica com Final Feliz (Tragic Story with Happy Ending, 2005) and A Suspeita (The Suspect, 2000) by José Miguel Ribeiro.

The Portuguese Film Institute provides support via annual funds dedicated to animated films, while a corporate tax rebate is available to up to 25% of the cost of production. It is hoped that this will help make Portugal a more financially viable place to produce animation in the future.

Animation brain drain and funding struggles

The lack of work available in Portugal for animators has resulted in a significant amount of talent leaving to work in other countries where there are more job opportunities for animators. It is hoped that providing financial incentives for animation production in Portugal could help bring some of that talent back, along with their expertise and contacts.

Public broadcaster RTP is the only Portuguese broadcaster to invest in domestic animation on a regular basis, meaning the sector suffers from a lack of support from the majority of local broadcasters in Portugal.

Calls for extra support

The producers working in animation in Portugal are pushing ahead with the development and production of a small number of animated feature films and series, which, if successful, could provide a key stimulus for growth. There is also scope for greater collaboration between local producers and Portugal’s increasingly active gaming industry.

Local producers are also calling for the tax rebate to be extended in order to benefit the animation sector, while one solution to the lack of support from local broadcasters is the introduction of on-air quotas for animated content produced in Portugal. It would not take a lot in terms of government intervention to make a significant, positive impact on animation production in Portugal.

APPA

Founded in 2003, the Association of Portuguese Producers of Animation (APPA), brings together the majority of animation producers in Portugal, and is one of the two institutional partners that represent this activity (there is also an association of animators) in the dialogue with ICA (Instituto de Cinema Português), with the Ministry of Culture, and is a member of SECA, an institution that assembles all the collective entities of representation of cinema and audiovisual. It is also a recognized partner of RTP, national public television channel. Over the years, APPA has contributed to the formulation of the legislation that regulates the activity in our country.